Global Innovation Index 2012 - US 10, UK 5, Hong Kong (China) 8, Canada 12, Germany 15, France 24, Japan 25, China 34 Italy 36

Global Innovation Index 2012 - US 10, UK 5, Hong Kong (China) 8, Canada 12, Germany 15, France 24, Japan 25, China 34 Italy 36

The United States may be home to Facebook, Google, Apple, and taco shells made of Doritos, but according to a recent international study, our nation is becoming less innovative, at least compared to last year. After ranking 7th in 2011, the U.S. is ranked 10th in this year's Global Innovation Index, a massive report published by Insead and the World Intellectual Property Organization.

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U.S. Drops in Global Innovation Rankings

 

 

Out of 141 countries in 2012 vs 125 countries in 2011

 

The United States may be home to Facebook, Google, Apple, and taco shells made of Doritos, but according to a recent international study, our nation is becoming less innovative, at least compared to last year. After ranking 7th in 2011, the U.S. is ranked 10th in this year's Global Innovation Index, a massive report published by Insead, an international business school, and the World Intellectual Property Organization, an agency of the United Nations.

The report ranks 141 nations on nearly 100 factors related to innovation, in areas like "Business sophistication," "Human capital & research," and "Knowledge & technology outputs." Switzerland and Sweden are ranked Nos. 1 and 2, respectively, for the second straight year. Rounding out the top five are Singapore, Finland, and the United Kingdom.

The survey is divided into 21 sub-groups which contain related metrics. In only "Creative intangibles" (No. 84), "Ecological sustainability" (No. 73), and "Trade & competition" (No. 69), does the U.S. rank worse than it does in two education sub-groups.

In a category related to K-12 education, the U.S. is ranked 31st, owing to low rankings in education expenditures. Our pupil-to-teacher ratio in secondary education, at 13.8:1, is ranked 61st. In higher education, the U.S. ranks second in enrollment, but 74th in students graduating with science and engineering degrees. Elsewhere, the U.S. ranks No. 1 in the amount of students taking the GMATs, the entry exam for business school, but 53rd on GMAT mean score.

Take these numbers with a grain of salt; the top three ranked countries for K-12 education are Ireland, Uzbekistan, and Lesotho. You can read the full ratings in each category for the U.S. below.

Many of these rankings are things we already know, but it's interesting to see the statistics put into a bigger picture as it relates to innovation. It's also strange to have a word as nebulous—and, at times, meaningless, as has been speculated on this blog before—as innovation quantified and treated as a metric.

But it's also tough to give the rankings a lot of weight. Does teacher-to-pupil ratio truly spark innovation? Some would define virtual learning, with its teacher-to-pupil ratio in the hundreds, as a leading example of innovation in education. Similarly, America's top rankings in the category of "Market sophistication," including the amount of stocks traded (No. 1), the value of venture capital deals (No. 5), and the ease of getting credit (No. 2), could be construed as vibrant business development for some and a sign of reckless spending, or even a bubble, to others.

As The Economist points out, some factors are simply more important than others, and some factors—like spawning profitable, globally leading technology companies like those aforementioned—cannot be quantified.

"The crux of the issue is two fold," says a post on The Economist's "Graphic Detail" blog. "First, the index is misnamed. It is meant to measure the 'enabling environment' for innovation, rather than the product itself."

For instance, South Korea and Japan, two of the most internet-connected nations with among the most robust technology economies, are ranked 21st and 25th respectively (for what it's worth, both of those countries also finished in the top 8 on the most recent PISA survey in 2009).

Some of America's drop can probably be chalked up to the recession; the report itself suggests a lack of growth compared to other top nations is the likely cause for the fall.

So, if we didn't know already, in order to create innovators through education we need to increase rigor in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math instruction; teach students business acumen and entrepreneurship; and lower class sizes. Get to it!

Oh, and there's another factor we should watch out for: We are No. 2 in the world in video uploads to YouTube. According to the Global Innovation Index, this is a good thing, but I can't see the harm in dropping a few spots before next year.

 


country/Economy Score(0–100) rank Income rank region rank

Switzerland 68.2 1 HI 1 Eur 1
Sweden 64.8 2 HI 2 Eur 2
Singapore 63.5 3 HI 3 SEAO 1
finland 61.8 4 HI 4 Eur 3
united Kingdom 61.2 5 HI 5 Eur 4
Netherlands 60.5 6 HI 6 Eur 5
Denmark 59.9 7 HI 7 Eur 6
Hong Kong (china) 58.7 8 HI 8 SEAO 2
Ireland 58.7 9 HI 9 Eur 7
united States of America 57.7 10 HI 10 NAc 1
Luxembourg 57.7 11 HI 11 Eur 8
canada 56.9 12 HI 12 NAc 2
New Zealand 56.6 13 HI 13 SEAO 3
Norway 56.4 14 HI 14 Eur 9
Germany 56.2 15 HI 15 Eur 10
Malta 56.1 16 HI 16 Eur 11
Israel 56.0 17 HI 17 NAWA 1
Iceland 55.7 18 HI 18 Eur 12
Estonia 55.3 19 HI 19 Eur 13
Belgium 54.3 20 HI 20 Eur 14
Korea, rep. 53.9 21 HI 21 SEAO 4
Austria 53.1 22 HI 22 Eur 15
Australia 51.9 23 HI 23 SEAO 5
france 51.8 24 HI 24 Eur 16
Japan 51.7 25 HI 25 SEAO 6
Slovenia 49.9 26 HI 26 Eur 17
czech republic 49.7 27 HI 27 Eur 18
cyprus 47.9 28 HI 28 NAWA 2
Spain 47.2 29 HI 29 Eur 19
Latvia 47.0 30 uM 1 Eur 20
Hungary 46.5 31 HI 30 Eur 21
Malaysia 45.9 32 uM 2 SEAO 7
Qatar 45.5 33 HI 31 NAWA 3
china 45.4 34 uM 3 SEAO 8
portugal 45.3 35 HI 32 Eur 22
Italy 44.5 36 HI 33 Eur 23
united Arab Emirates 44.4 37 HI 34 NAWA 4
Lithuania 44.0 38 uM 4 Eur 24
chile 42.7 39 uM 5 LcN 1
Slovakia 41.4 40 HI 35 Eur 25
Bahrain 41.1 41 HI 36 NAWA 5
croatia 40.7 42 HI 37 Eur 26
Bulgaria 40.7 43 uM 6 Eur 27
poland 40.4 44 HI 38 Eur 28
Montenegro 40.1 45 uM 7 Eur 29
Serbia 40.0 46 uM 8 Eur 30
Oman 39.5 47 HI 39 NAWA 6
Saudi Arabia 39.3 48 HI 40 NAWA 7
Mauritius 39.2 49 uM 9 SSf 1
Moldova, rep. 39.2 50 LM 1 Eur 31
russian federation 37.9 51 uM 10 Eur 32
romania 37.8 52 uM 11 Eur 33
Brunei Darussalam 37.7 53 HI 41 SEAO 9
South Africa 37.4 54 uM 12 SSf 2
Kuwait 37.2 55 HI 42 NAWA 8
Jordan 37.1 56 uM 13 NAWA 9
Thailand 36.9 57 uM 14 SEAO 10
Brazil 36.6 58 uM 15 LcN 2
Tunisia 36.5 59 uM 16 NAWA 10
costa rica 36.3 60 uM 17 LcN 3
Lebanon 36.2 61 uM 18 NAWA 11
Macedonia, fyr 36.2 62 uM 19 Eur 34
ukraine 36.1 63 LM 2 Eur 35
India 35.7 64 LM 3 cSA 1
colombia 35.5 65 uM 20 LcN 4
Greece 35.3 66 HI 43 Eur 36
uruguay 35.1 67 uM 21 LcN 5
Mongolia 35.0 68 LM 4 SEAO 11
Armenia 34.5 69 LM 5 NAWA 12
Argentina 34.4 70 uM 22 LcN 6
Georgia 34.3 71 LM 6 NAWA 13
country/Economy Score (0–100) rank Income rank region rank
Bosnia and Herzegovina 34.2 72 uM 23 Eur 37
Namibia 34.1 73 uM 24 SSf 3
Turkey 34.1 74 uM 25 NAWA 14
peru 34.1 75 uM 26 LcN 7
viet Nam 33.9 76 LM 7 SEAO 12
Guyana 33.7 77 LM 8 LcN 8
Belarus 32.9 78 uM 27 Eur 38
Mexico 32.9 79 uM 28 LcN 9
Belize 32.5 80 LM 9 LcN 10
Trinidad and Tobago 32.5 81 HI 44 LcN 11
Swaziland 32.0 82 LM 10 SSf 4
Kazakhstan 31.9 83 uM 29 cSA 2
paraguay 31.6 84 LM 11 LcN 12
Botswana 31.4 85 uM 30 SSf 5
Dominican republic 30.9 86 uM 31 LcN 13
panama 30.9 87 uM 32 LcN 14
Morocco 30.7 88 LM 12 NAWA 15
Azerbaijan 30.4 89 uM 33 NAWA 16
Albania 30.4 90 uM 34 Eur 39
Jamaica 30.2 91 uM 35 LcN 15
Ghana 29.6 92 LM 13 SSf 6
El Salvador 29.5 93 LM 14 LcN 16
Sri Lanka 29.1 94 LM 15 cSA 3
philippines 29.0 95 LM 16 SEAO 13
Kenya 28.9 96 LI 1 SSf 7
Senegal 28.8 97 LM 17 SSf 8
Ecuador 28.5 98 uM 36 LcN 17
Guatemala 28.4 99 LM 18 LcN 18
Indonesia 28.1 100 LM 19 SEAO 14
fiji 27.9 101 LM 20 SEAO 15
rwanda 27.9 102 LI 2 SSf 9
Egypt 27.9 103 LM 21 NAWA 17
Iran, Islamic rep. 27.3 104 uM 37 cSA 4
Nicaragua 26.7 105 LM 22 LcN 19
Gabon 26.5 106 uM 38 SSf 10
Zambia 26.4 107 LM 23 SSf 11
Tajikistan 26.4 108 LI 3 cSA 5
Kyrgyzstan 26.4 109 LI 4 cSA 6
Mozambique 26.3 110 LI 5 SSf 12
Honduras 26.3 111 LM 24 LcN 20
Bangladesh 26.1 112 LI 6 cSA 7
Nepal 26.0 113 LI 7 cSA 8
Bolivia, plurinational St. 25.8 114 LM 25 LcN 21
Zimbabwe 25.7 115 LI 8 SSf 13
Lesotho 25.7 116 LM 26 SSf 14
uganda 25.6 117 LI 9 SSf 15
venezuela, Bolivarian rep. 25.4 118 uM 39 LcN 22
Mali 25.4 119 LI 10 SSf 16
Malawi 25.4 120 LI 11 SSf 17
cameroon 25.0 121 LM 27 SSf 18
Burkina faso 24.6 122 LI 12 SSf 19
Nigeria 24.6 123 LM 28 SSf 20
Algeria 24.4 124 uM 40 NAWA 18
Benin 24.4 125 LI 13 SSf 21
Madagascar 24.2 126 LI 14 SSf 22
uzbekistan 23.9 127 LM 29 cSA 9
Tanzania, united rep. 23.9 128 LI 15 SSf 23
cambodia 23.4 129 LI 16 SEAO 16
Gambia 23.3 130 LI 17 SSf 24
Ethiopia 23.3 131 LI 18 SSf 25
Syrian Arab rep. 23.1 132 LM 30 NAWA 19
pakistan 23.1 133 LM 31 cSA 10
côte d'Ivoire 22.6 134 LM 32 SSf 26
Angola 22.2 135 LM 33 SSf 27
Togo 20.5 136 LI 19 SSf 28
Burundi 20.5 137 LI 20 SSf 29
Lao pDr 20.2 138 LM 34 SEAO 17
yemen 19.2 139 LM 35 NAWA 20
Niger 18.6 140 LI 21 SSf 30
Sudan 16.8 141 LM 36 SSf 31

 

INSEAD Issues The Global Innovation Index 2011 Switzerland ranks first among 125 economies on innovation levels

Abu Dhabi (UAE), Fontainebleau (France), Geneva (Switzerland), and Singapore, 30 June 2011 – INSEAD, the leading international business school, today announced the findings of The Global Innovation Index (GII) 2011 edition. Switzerland topped this year's GII ranking, gaining three spots from its position in last year’s GII. Sweden and Singapore follow in the 2nd and 3rd positions, respectively. Joining INSEAD as Knowledge Partners for the report were Alcatel-Lucent, Booz & Company, the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), a specialized agency of the United Nations.

This year’s rankings show that innovation has become a global phenomenon with six European economies (including Finland 5th, Denmark 6th, the Netherlands 9th and the United Kingdom 10th), two Asian (including Hong Kong, SAR, China 4th) and two North American economies (the United States 7th and Canada 8th) in the Top 10. 
‘Innovation is critical to driving growth in both developed and emerging economies, especially during a time when the global economy is still in a state of recovery,’ said Soumitra Dutta, Roland Berger Professor of Business and Technology at INSEAD and editor of the study. ‘The GII has evolved into a valuable benchmarking tool to encourage private-public dialogue including policy-makers, business leaders and other stakeholders.’

WIPO Director General Francis Gurry stressed that ‘Innovation is central to economic growth and to the creation of new and better jobs. It is the key to competitiveness for economies, for industries and for individual firms.’ He added that ‘innovation and its many benefits do not come without the investment of time, effort and human and financial resources,’ noting that this report captures efforts by a large number of economies to provide an enabling environment that promotes innovation.

The five Nordic economies—Sweden (2nd), Finland (5th), Denmark (6th), Iceland (11th), and Norway (18th)—have very strong performances globally as well as regionally. Within the European Union (EU), the Netherlands and the UK are in the top 10, followed by Germany (12th), Ireland (13th), Luxembourg (17th), and Austria (19th) in the top 20. 
The GII includes 16 economies from the Middle East and North Africa, of which two—Israel (14th) and Qatar (26th)—are ranked among the top 30; both high-income economies. Among Sub-Saharan African economies, Mauritius (53rd overall) achieves the top regional spot while South Africa (59th) is the runner-up. Ghana comes next at position 70, and ranked first among economies classified as low-income, all regions combined.

In Latin America and the Caribbean, Chile comes first (ranked 38th), followed by Costa Rica (45th) and Brazil (47th) among the top 50.

Of the four economies from South Asia in the GII, India is ranked 62nd overall, followed by Sri Lanka (82nd), Bangladesh (97th), and Pakistan (105th). From East Asia and the Pacific, besides the leading positions of Singapore (3rd) and Hong Kong (SAR, China, 4th), five more are in the top 30: New Zealand (15th), the Republic of Korea (16th), Japan (20th), Australia (21st), and China (29th), the top-ranked emerging economy.

Dr. Naushad Forbes, Chairman of the CII Innovation Council 2011-12 and Director of Forbes Marshall commented: ‘Today the whole world is talking about innovation in all forms starting from industry to government to society. After the recent economic slowdown the focus has shifted clearly towards the developing regions not only in terms of a booming potential market but also a hot spot for frugal innovations. Measuring this shift is important to know how we are doing, the GII is a starting point to do that and unquestionably in the right direction.’

The Global Innovation Index is computed as an average of the scores across inputs pillars (describing the enabling environment for innovation) and output pillars (measuring actual achievements in innovation). Five pillars constitute the Innovation Input Sub-Index: 'Institutions,' 'Human capital and research,' 'Infrastructure', 'Market sophistication' and 'Business sophistication'. The Innovation Output Sub-Index is composed of two pillars: 'Scientific outputs' and 'Creative outputs’. The Innovation Efficiency Index, calculated as the ratio of the two Sub-Indices, examines how economies leverage their enabling environments to stimulate innovation results.
The top 10 economies in the Innovation Efficiency Index are Côte d’Ivoire, Nigeria, China, Pakistan, Moldova, Sweden, Brazil, Argentina, India, and Bangladesh. Three BRIC economies (Brazil, India, and China) are in this select list, with the fourth, the Russian Federation, coming in at 52nd place. By region, the best performers are Côte d’Ivoire (1st), China (3rd), Pakistan (4th), Moldova (5th), Brazil (7th), Jordan (16th), and the US (26th). By income group, in descending order of income, leaders are Sweden (6th), Brazil (7th), Côte d’Ivoire (1st), and Bangladesh (10th).

Ben Verwaayen, CEO of Alcatel-Lucent, said: ‘The world faces many daunting societal challenges, which require bold, creative leaps to meet them. We need an environment where open innovation can thrive and be supported by dynamic collaboration between industries, enterprise, governments and the scientific community.’

Shumeet Banerji, Chief Executive Officer of Booz & Company added: ‘The ability to innovate is the great equalizer in the global economy. In the industrial era, nations relied on their natural resources to compete. Today, any country can advance with carefully focused investments in talent and R&D. The performance of some emerging economies in this year's GII shows what nations can accomplish with a focus on building 21st century economies.’

The top ten economies in the GII 2011 ranking are:

1. Switzerland 6. Denmark
2. Sweden 7. United States
3. Singapore 8. Canada
4. Hong Kong (SAR) 9. Netherlands
5. Finland 10. United Kingdom


The GII is a collaborative effort 

Alcatel-Lucent, Booz & Company, the Confederation of Indian Industry, and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) are Knowledge Partners in the GII. Knowledge Partners participated in the project by providing their input to the research underlying the GII, and contributing to the dissemination of the results. In addition, in 2011 for the first time, an Advisory Board comprised of nine international practitioners and experts who bring unique knowledge and skills in the realm of innovation was created to assist with the research and the dissemination of results.

Although the general framework of past editions was maintained, important efforts were made this year to incorporate novel objective metrics from international organizations and private sources. The European Commission Joint Research Centre (Ispra, Italy) performed an independent assessment of the robustness of the GII 2011 results by means of a thorough Statistical Audit, the results of which are included in the Report.

The Report includes analytical chapters to expose recent global innovation trends that can hardly be captured by traditional metrics. These were provided by Knowledge Partners, all leading actors in the area of innovation. Topics include: affordable innovations in India; insights on innovation in Latin America; the smart and sustainable cities; the global footprint of R&D, and metrics on creativity and copyright-related industries.




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